Saturday, August 4, 2012

Fall for Anything by Courtney Summers

Title: Fall for Anything
Author: Courtney Summers
Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin
Release Date: December 21, 2010
Pages: 230 pages (paperback)
How I Got the Book: Bought it.
Purchase/Pre-order: Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Book Depository
Promotional Materials and More: book trailer | author website

Fall for AnythingFrom the author of Cracked Up to Be and Some Girls Are comes a gripping story about one girl’s search for clues into the mysterious death of her father.

When Eddie Reeves’s father commits suicide her life is consumed by the nagging question of why? Why when he was a legendary photographer and a brilliant teacher? Why when he seemed to find inspiration in everything he saw? And, most important, why when he had a daughter who loved him more than anyone else in the world? When she meets Culler Evans, a former student of her father’s and a photographer himself, an instant and dangerous attraction begins. Culler seems to know more about her father than she does and could possibly hold the key to the mystery surrounding his death. But Eddie’s vulnerability has weakened her and Culler Evans is getting too close. Her need for the truth keeps her hanging on...but are some questions better left unanswered?

Review:


My Courtney Summers Love-a-Thon, begun when I fell in love with her latest novel This Is Not a Test, continues with her third novel, Fall for Anything. In a small town, a daughter's grief over her father's mysterious suicide grabs hold of readers by the throat and won't let them go until the last page is turned. As always, the enviable prose and ability to wrench so much emotion from both the characters and from readers makes me wish I could crawl around in the author's head and figure out how she does it.

Like all of Summers' heroines, Eddie isn't an easy girl to like and sympathizing with her can be hard sometimes, especially considering what she puts her friends and family through later in the book. Her grief is all too real and incredibly powerful, and the sparse yet poetic prose help bring all the painful emotions the characters express to life. Why these books aren't more popular when they're so real and can make you feel what the characters are going through no matter what situation you're in is a mystery to me. A question without an answer.

The novel is difficult to get into for the first eighty pages, but once Culler came in (let's not talk about Culler; I want to hurt him and that's all you need to know) and he brought his camera with him, I couldn't put it down. It helps that I'm somewhat into photography myself, though I think the novel would have drawn me in regardless of whether or not I was. It's the storytelling element of photography as used in the novel that really spoke to me and make me keep turning the pages, along with Eddie's journey to find out why.

In the end, we never really learn why Eddie's dad did what he did and though the questions I still have nag at me (like why Eddie hated Missy so much and did half the stuff she did), I think it's okay for me to not have all the answers. Some questions simply don't have answers or if they did have an answer at some point, it's no longer possible to find out what it is. I feel that's one of the themes of this novel: you're never going to have all the answers because life isn't that easy.

Now I'm almost completely caught up on Courtney Summers' backlist, leaving Some Girls Are the only books of hers I haven't read (barring the books she hasn't published yet, of course). I plan to get a copy of that soon; I hear it's her strongest work and I'm looking forward to it.

4 stars!


What am I reading next?: Foretold edited by Carrie Ryan

3 comments:

  1. I'm still waiting to get This Is Not a Test. I should get Fall for Anything while I'm at it. It definitely sounds like something I would like.

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  2. I keep hearing about this author but I haven't read any of her books yet. I'll have to get on that. ;) Great review!

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  3. I LOVED every one of Courtney Summers books, but I think that Some Girls might be my very favorite. Since you loved Speechless, I think you'd really love Some Girls -- some similar themes of a popular girl who steps out of line with her clique and gets relentlessly bullied by her former friends.
    There are parts of Some Girls that I reread just because I think Courtney Summers' writing is so concise and so heartbreaking. How does she do that?

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